EDAX in the News

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  • New Trends in Global Failure Analysis Market | Emerging Technology with prominent Key Players
    New Trends in Global Failure Analysis Market | Emerging Technology with prominent Key Players

    Sunday, November 18, 2018

    Failure Analysis Market is accounted for $ 5300.26 Million in 2017 and is expected to reach $11150.26 Million by 2026 growing at a CAGR of 8.6% during the forecast period. Rising applications of failure analysis equipment in nanotechnology and medical applications and advancements in technology and usage of failure analysis equipment in semiconductors are some of the factors driving the market. However, high maintenance and equipment cost may hinder the market growth. Demand for failure analysis equipment in emerging nations may create an opportunity to the market.

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  • AMETEK India Opens A Technology Solutions Center in Bangalore
    AMETEK India Opens A Technology Solutions Center in Bangalore

    Friday, October 12, 2018

    American manufacturer of electronic instruments and electromechanical devices AMETEK Instruments has set up a technology solutions centre at its headquarters in Whitefield, Bangalore, to support the growth of its electronic instrument and electromechanical products businesses in India.

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  • "Biomineralization as a Paradigm of Directional Solidification: A Physical Model for Molluscan Shell Ultrastructural Morphogenesis" in the September 2018 issue of Advanced Materials
    Biomineralization as a Paradigm of Directional Solidification: A Physical Model for Molluscan Shell Ultrastructural Morphogenesis

    Tuesday, October 2, 2018

    Molluscan shells are a model system to understand the fundamental principles of mineral formation by living organisms. The diversity of unconventional mineral morphologies and 3D mineral–organic architectures that comprise these tissues, in combination with their exceptional mechanical efficiency, offers a unique platform to study the formation–structure–function relationship in a biomineralized system. However, so far, morphogenesis of these ultrastructures is poorly understood. Here, a comprehensive physical model, based on the concept of directional solidification, is developed to describe molluscan shell biomineralization. The capacity of the model to define the forces and thermodynamic constraints that guide the morphogenesis of the entire shell construct—the prismatic and nacreous ultrastructures and their transitions—and govern the evolution of the constituent mineralized assemblies on the ultrastructural and nanostructural levels is demonstrated using the shell of the bivalve Unio pictorum. Thereby, explicit tools for novel bioinspired and biomimetic bottom‐up materials design are provided.

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  • "Conducting controlled in situ high temperature tensile tests within a SEM" from the July/August 2018 issue of Microscopy & Analysis
    Conducting controlled in situ high temperature tensile tests within a SEM

    Thursday, July 12, 2018

    A methodology to perform in situ high temperature tensile tests of Mg-alloys within a SEM with a high degree of mechanical and temperature control is described in detail. The fact that Mg might vaporize under vacuum requires technical challenges to be overcome if one aims at conducting tests without damaging the microscope. The detailed methodology enabled insights into the link between the development of local strain heterogeneities and the occurrence of fundamental deformation mechanisms.

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  • In-situ study of crack initiation and propagation in a dual phase AlCoCrFeNi entropy alloy
    In-situ study of crack initiation and propagation in a dual phase AlCoCrFeNi entropy alloy

    Saturday, July 1, 2017

    This study reports the effect of phase distribution on crack propagation in a dual phase AlCoCrFeNi high entropy alloy (HEA) under tensile loading. The alloy is characterized by the presence of a brittle disordered BCC phase that can be toughened by precipitation of a ductile FCC phase during homogenization heat treatment. The stress and strain partitioning between the two phases is of paramount importance to determine the mechanical response of this alloy. The as-cast alloy was subjected to homogenization at 1273 K for 6 h to prevent the formation of detrimental sigma phases and to precipitate the ductile FCC phase. In-situ tensile test in a scanning electron microscope with an electron backscatter diffraction facility was carried out to understand the micro-mechanisms of deformation of the alloy. Precipitation of the FCC phase at the BCC grain boundaries reflected the effect of the FCC phase on crack deflection and branching during propagation. The strain partitioning between the two phases and the evolution of misorientation distribution was investigated. It is observed that the presence of ductile FCC high entropy phase can impart good room temperature ductility to the brittle BCC phase. As there are very few investigations performed on the dual phase HEAs, a proper microstructural design can be achieved and can be utilized to toughen the brittle HEAs.

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  • Measurement of Grain Boundary Properties in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Thin Films
    Measurement of Grain Boundary Properties in Cu(ln,Ga)Se2 Thin Films

    Wednesday, May 31, 2017

    Semiconductors CulnSe2 (CIS) and alloys of Cu(ln,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) are often used as the light absorbing layer in thin film photovoltaic devices. These polycrystalline materials reach good conversion efficiencies despite the presence of grain boundaries, which can degrade device performance. Grain properties such as size distribution and orientation can be characterized using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The EBSD method has been used extensively to determine texture and recrystallization in metal forming processes but to a lesser extent for characterization of CIGS thin film properties. This article describes measurements of grain properties for CIGS thin films grown under different reaction conditions.

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  • Improvements in SDD Efficiency - From X-ray Counts to Data
    Improvements in SDD Efficiency - From X-ray Counts to Data

    Wednesday, March 1, 2017

    Continuing advancements in window materials, detector modules, and electronics are leading to higher count rates, better light-element sensitivity, and improved energy-resolution stability over a wide range of count rates. In this article, we will briefly review how the different parts of the EDS system interact, from X-rays leaving the sample to the production of useful data and where recent changes have taken place. We then apply the gains offered by this new technology to three samples to illustrate the benefits that can be reaped.

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  • Introduction and Comparison of New EBSD Post-Processing Methodologies
    Introduction and Comparison of New EBSD Post-Processing Methodologies

    Tuesday, December 1, 2015

    Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) provides a useful means for characterizing microstructure. However, it can be difficult to obtain index-able diffraction patterns from some samples. This can lead to noisy maps reconstructed from the scan data. Various post-processing methodologies have been developed to improve the scan data generally based on correlating non-indexed or mis-indexed points with the orientations obtained at neighboring points in the scan grid. Two new approaches are introduced (1) a re-scanning approach using local pattern averaging and (2) using the multiple solutions obtained by the triplet indexing method. These methodologies are applied to samples with noise introduced into the patterns artificially and by the operational settings of the EBSD camera. They are also applied to a heavily deformed and a fine-grained sample. In all cases, both techniques provide an improvement in the resulting scan data, the local pattern averaging providing the most improvement of the two. However, the local pattern averaging is most helpful when the noise in the patterns is due to the camera operating conditions as opposed to inherent challenges in the sample itself. A byproduct of this study was insight into the validity of various indexing success rate metrics. A metric based given by the fraction of points with CI values greater than some tolerance value (0.1 in this case) was confirmed to provide an accurate assessment of the indexing success rate.

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  • High Spatial Resolution in X-ray Mapping
    High Spatial Resolution in X-ray Mapping

    Wednesday, July 1, 2015

    Various microanalysis applications, such as semiconductor and microelectronics, nanotechnology and life sciences, require high resolution analytical performance to understand subtle differences that impact the material's characteristics. The term resolution describes several different aspects of scanning electron microscope (SEM) based microanalysis. In general, it is defined as the ability of the system to resolve, or separate, two aspects of the analysis that are very close together. In imaging and mapping, resolution may be described as the ability to visibly separate two physically closely spaced items. In an X-ray spectrum, it means the ability to differentiate between two elements whose peaks fall at closely spaced energies, as with light element peak separation or low energy X-ray lines.

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  • Elemental Analysis of Silicon in Plant Material with Variable-Pressure SEM
    Elemental Analysis of Silicon in Plant Material with Variable-Pressure SEM

    Sunday, March 1, 2015

    The cellular structure of biological plant material has been well characterized by light and electron microscopy [1]. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) uses an electron beam to scan the surface of a sample to study the external morphology of plant cells, tissues, and organs [2]. Analytical SEM beam conditions are typically tailored to the requirements of the sample being investigated, and in the case of biological plant specimens, a low-kV electron beam (1 to 5 kV) is routinely employed for sample surface imaging to reduce beam damage to the tissue. For certain analyses, as in this work, it is necessary to work at non-conventional operating conditions in order to fully characterize the materials being studied by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS). By varying the SEM beam conditions, inorganic phases can be located either at the top surface or in the sub-surface regions of plant tissue.

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  • Electron Imaging with an EBSD Detector
    Electron Imaging with an EBSD Detector

    Thursday, January 1, 2015

    Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) has proven to be a useful tool for characterizing the crystallographic orientation aspects of microstructures at length scales ranging from tens of nanometers to millimeters in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). With the advent of high-speed digital cameras for EBSD use, it has become practical to use the EBSD detector as an imaging device similar to a backscatter (or forward-scatter) detector. Using the EBSD detector in this manner enables images exhibiting topographic, atomic density and orientation contrast to be obtained at rates similar to slow scanning in the conventional SEM manner. The high-speed acquisition is achieved through extreme binning of the camera—enough to result in a 5×5 pixel pattern. At such high binning, the captured patterns are not suitable for indexing. However, no indexing is required for using the detector as an imaging device. Rather, a 5×5 array of images is formed by essentially using each pixel in the 5×5 pixel pattern as an individual scattered electron detector. The images can also be formed at traditional EBSD scanning rates by recording the image data during a scan or can also be formed through post-processing of patterns recorded at each point in the scan. Such images lend themselves to correlative analysis of image data with the usual orientation data provided by and with chemical data obtained simultaneously via X-Ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (XEDS).

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  • Using the Orbis Micro-XRF Spectrometer to Study the Microstructure of Ancient Roman Seawater Concrete
    Using the Orbis Micro-XRF Spectrometer to Study the Microstructure of Ancient Roman Seawater Concrete

    Monday, September 1, 2014

    Ancient Roman builders designed maritime concrete harbor structures to remain intact in the aggressive seawater environment for very long periods of time.

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  • Orientation Precision of Electron Backscatter Diffraction Measurements Near Grain Boundaries
    Investigations of twin boundary fatigue cracking in nickel and nitrogen-stabalized cold-worked austenitic stainless steels

    Monday, June 23, 2014

    Implant retrieval studies have indicated that the primary cause of failure in stainless steel devices is fatigue, and time or cycles required for fatigue crack initiation often consumes the majority of implant lifetime. Stainless steels with significant nitrogen additions have shown an improved fatigue response, but have also shown a peculiar preference for fatigue crack initiations at or along annealing twin boundaries in the face-centered cubic (FCC) materials. In a recent comparison study on cold-worked implant grade stainless steels, a number of fatigue crack initiations were found along former annealing twin boundaries on both nitrogen-stabilized austentitic (HNASS) and nickel-stabilized austenitic steels. Further investigations were warranted to determine the crystallographic conditions present around these annealing twin boundary cracks, since not every twin boundary showed crack initiation. The present study examined the crystallographic conditions present around each of the former annealing twin boundary cracks relative to the applied loading direction. It was determined that the former annealing twin boundary cracks showed the complete range of misorientation deviations allowed by the Brandon criterion. The textures of the cracked twin boundaries were found to be random relative to the overall global textures of the materials. Most of the cracked twin planes in the HNASS steel were shown to be high angles, and in many cases were nearly perpendicular to the material surface. The nickel-stabilized steel showed a preference for lower twin plane inclination angles relative to the material surface. High Schmid factors were shown for all grains surrounding the cracked twin boundaries indicating each grain was oriented favorably for slip relative to the applied loading direction. A high Taylor factor mismatch was also shown across most of the cracked twin boundaries in both steels indicating strong difference in expected yield response for each of the grains which suggest localized strain incompatibility was another important factor in twin boundary cracking.

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  • Analysis of advanced ceramic materials with phase mapping energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy
    Analysis of Advanced Ceramic Materials with Phase Mapping Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    Sunday, June 1, 2014

    This article gives an overview of how modern energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy phase mapping can be used as an effective and efficient substitute for the conventional use of EDS plus additional techniques such as XRD analysis to characterize sample compositional factors. As even minor variations affect the performance properties of advanced ceramic materials, this analytical method is useful in a broad range of manufacturing and industrial labs.

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  • Advanced Materials Characterization with Full-Spectrum Phase Mapping
    Advanced Materials Characterization with Full-Spectrum Phase Mapping

    Saturday, March 1, 2014

    X-ray mapping in electron microscopes with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) builds on the basics of qualitative X-ray microanalysis by providing a visual representation of the elements present. Mapping routines have long identified elements within a sample and displayed the elemental distribution in an image map of the sample area [1]. Often, visual comparisons of different element maps, side-by-side or overlaid, show where combinations of elements occur. These combinations of elements together in a map give a deeper understanding of the chemical nature of the material. However, image map comparison is only a starting point and does not make use of subtle differences in the full spectrum of elements. Therefore, more sophisticated routines that directly evaluate the total spectrum chemistry from a map dataset have been designed and incorporated into advanced systems to create a stronger foundation for advanced materials characterization.

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  • TESCAN and the University of Alabama Announce the Addition of the LYRA XMU FIB-SEM Workstation to the UA Central Analytical Facility, a National Facility of Excellence for Atom Probe Applications Development
    TESCAN and the University of Alabama Announce the Addition of the LYRA XMU FIB-SEM Workstation to the UA Central Analytical Facility, a National Facility of Excellence for Atom Probe Applications Development

    Wednesday, November 13, 2013

    CRANBERRY TOWNSHIP, Pa.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--TESCAN, a leading global supplier of scanning electron microscopes and focused ion beam workstations has delivered a LYRA FIB-SEM workstation to the University of Alabama Central Analytical Facility (CAF), a national center of excellence. The LYRA is a FIB-SEM workstation and will be used for preparing atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscope specimens. In the future, this instrument will be configured with an EDAX Pegasus EDS/EBSD system to provide chemical and structural analysis in three-dimensional views.

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  • Improved Sensitivity with the New Apollo XRF ML-50 Detector on the Orbis Micro-XRF Analyzer
    Improved Sensitivity with the New Apollo XRF ML-50 Detector on the Orbis Micro-XRF Analyzer

    Friday, February 1, 2013

    The measurement of trace elements is important across a wide variety of materials characterization problems. When measuring small glass fragments collected from crime and accident scenes, forensics experts analyze trace strontium (Sr) and zirconium (Zr) typically unintentionally incorporated into the glass during manufacturing as one point of identification or comparison.

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  • A new TriBeam system for three-dimensional multimodal materials analysis
    A new TriBeam system for three-dimensional multimodal materials analysis

    Friday, February 3, 2012

    The unique capabilities of ultrashort pulse femtosecond lasers have been integrated with a focused ion beam(FIB) platform to create a new system for rapid 3D materials analysis. The femtosecond laser allows for in situ layer-by-layer materialablation with high material removal rates. The high pulse frequency (1 kHz) of ultrashort (150 fs) laser pulses can induce materialablation with virtually no thermal damage to the surrounding area, permitting high resolution imaging, as well as crystallographic and elemental analysis, without intermediate surface preparation or removal of the sample from the chamber. The TriBeam system combines the high resolution and broad detector capabilities of the DualBeamTM microscope with the high material removal rates of the femtosecond laser, allowing 3D datasets to be acquired at rates 4–6 orders of magnitude faster than 3D FIB datasets. Design features that permit coupling of laser and electron optics systems and positioning of a stage in the multiple analysis positions are discussed. Initial in situ multilayer data are presented.

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